Myshadow46_2

Myshadow46_2's Profile Comments

Comments: 18, viewing 1 - 18

megan9987 wrote on Jul 14th, 2011 8:23am

Hello :D

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TechnicolorType wrote on Mar 8th, 2011 1:45pm

I'm sorry, but every single time I see your name as like the last poster - I automatically read it as "My eye shadow 46_2".

I thought you really might want to know this. :]

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Sonny_sam wrote on Nov 25th, 2010 10:10pm

Hey, sorry it took me ages to reply - I don't check my comments very often.
Unfortunately I've been living away for the past couple of years so I'm fairly out of touch with the local music scene. As far as I know there aren't really any other post rock/post metal bands around Nuneaton, but there are a few in Coventry. There's a venue called 'Taylor John's House' that promotes a lot of alternative/less mainstream music - you should get in touch with them and see if they can hook you up with some gigs!

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metaladdict123 wrote on Dec 10th, 2009 4:57pm

[quote u='Myshadow46_2' d='Dec 8th, 2009 4:46pm'][quote]yes its still the shape of these scales but the root note thirds and fifths are obviously arranged in terms of the key

ok this is the final thing im going to say, C major you can use the shape of a minor but you keep the value of the notes the same so basically you are playing and extended Cmajor scale acroos the whole neck. ok
next if you have C major to make it C minor or C dorian, you have to then consider the intervals and what makes the scale unique and what arpeggios traids chords double stops you can use. basically you are saying this which is what i have said.

i am saying that using the shapes give you an extended scale which you can use within the key and in relation to the progression you are using. Obviously if you were to change the scale from C major to C minor you would create different intervals and so different chords are required. This is right and is also what i have been saying but you seemed to ignore.

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metaladdict123 wrote on Dec 8th, 2009 1:02pm

Myshadow46_2 wrote on Dec 7th, 2009 at 11:23pm :
They are not the same. A minor is derived from the A major scale. the A major scale is A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G#. If you flatten the 3rd, 6th and 7th scale degree you now have A, B, C, D, E, F, G which is the A natural minor scale. That last sentence makes no sense at all. A minor is a different scale to the C major scale fullstop. Targeting the root stops it being A anything, it becomes C major and therefore is constructed differently.


oh i see i meant if you target the A of an A minor its ok becuase thats the root note but if you target the C as the root you are implying the realtive major and a mode of the A natural minor. But if you are in the key of A dont treat the C as the root because then you will be in the wrong key.

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metaladdict123 wrote on Dec 8th, 2009 11:21am

Myshadow46_2 wrote on Dec 7th, 2009 at 11:23pm :
If you play the same notes, but start from the A on the 5th fret of the low E you are still playing in C major. Only if you adapt the progression to resolve to an Am chord will you be playing in A minor.


really you are just reinforcing what i have been saying all along and seem to be ignoring the fact that i said the key will dtermin the chord progression so if i am in minor with a II V I progression the I chord would be an A something normally Am7.
yes this correct but while soloing over this progression i can use the C major SHAPE, because the same notes are found here but target the A as the root note the C as the b3 in order to remain in key. You dont nessecarily need to adapt the progression to play the C major SHAPE, FCKING SHAPE when you know which notes you are treating as the root in this case A

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metaladdict123 wrote on Dec 8th, 2009 11:09am

Myshadow46_2 wrote on Dec 7th, 2009 at 11:23pm :
They are not the same. A minor is derived from the A major scale. the A major scale is A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G#. If you flatten the 3rd, 6th and 7th scale degree you now have A, B, C, D, E, F, G which is the A natural minor scale. That last sentence makes no sense at all.

this is why you are wrong, a C minor would be a different scale to C major as you have described but C major and the relative A minor are different, the shape is that of an A natural minor but the notes and how you use them suggest C major so you are basically playing the C major but extending vertically to reach the appropriate note which is in key. if you do this wow an A minor shape.

you previously applied that explanation at the top to C major and A natural minor even though they contain the same notes, so you actually need to read up a bit more

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metaladdict123 wrote on Dec 7th, 2009 10:51pm

Myshadow46_2 wrote on Dec 7th, 2009 at 12:46pm :
Shapes have nothing to do with modes. Shapes just happen to be a helpful guide to finding the notes you want on the fretboard.

C major has the intervals 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

A minor has the intervals 1 2 3b 4 5 6b 7b

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yes the intervals they are the intervals for a minor and c major, but those intervals apply when you are the scale in the same postion. for example c major has 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 and then the C minor you would have to flatten the 3rd and so on.

this does not relate to moving C major to A minor as you are technically not changing the notes you are using the same notes but from a different starting point.

really i think your getting mixed up, just think why would you need to flatten notes if they are all the same. A minor is a different scale if you target the a as a root note if you target the C as the root its a mode of the C major.

i think you need to read up on this from a different source

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metaladdict123 wrote on Dec 7th, 2009 12:35pm

Myshadow46_2 wrote on Dec 7th, 2009 at 9:26am :
The notes in C ionian, D dorian, E phrygian, F lydian, G mixolydian, A aeolian and B locrian are the same, yes. However the intervals that make up those scales are different. Therefore they are different.
So for example a I IV V progression in the key of C (C maj, F maj, G maj) resolves very strongly to the C maj. Therefore you can only play over it in C, any other notes are accidentals.

Like I said. Read the sticky.


but your still suggesting that i was talking about changing the key, im changing the shape but keeping the note values the same. e.g what notes to land on what to exclude that all still keep me in the key of C.
The intervals are only different if you apply it to the same key e.g c major will have different intervals to c dorian but c major and the a minor shape will have the same intervals but in a different place

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metaladdict123 wrote on Dec 7th, 2009 12:21pm

Myshadow46_2 wrote on Dec 7th, 2009 at 9:26am :
The notes in C ionian, D dorian, E phrygian, F lydian, G mixolydian, A aeolian and B locrian are the same, yes. However the intervals that make up those scales are different. Therefore they are different. Most modes are very unstable and will try to resolve back to their relative major so to use a mode you require a progression that resolves to the tonic of the mode and highlights the note that makes the mode different from the others. For example the dorian mode's is its natural 6th.

So for example a I IV V progression in the key of C (C maj, F maj, G maj) resolves very strongly to the C maj. Therefore you can only play over it in C, any other notes are accidentals.

Like I said. Read the sticky.


yes of course you have to resolve back to more stable notes such as the root, and of course you have to consider the actual notes in the chords of the progression. I was talking about modes in generall not nessecarily targeted at the progression

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metaladdict123 wrote on Dec 7th, 2009 12:15pm

go to this website

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/gu...et&t=0&choic e=1

you can see the c natural minor shape above the D# major, so its the C natural minor shape but the notes are all related to the Eb major e.g. Eb still being the root note

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catrolean wrote on Dec 6th, 2009 5:23am

<3 your music :)

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metaladdict123 wrote on Dec 5th, 2009 2:51am

of course you have to remember to keep the value of the notes the same e.g. key of C with C remaining as the root note, just in the shape of a natural minor

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metaladdict123 wrote on Dec 5th, 2009 1:21am

yes the key will determine the notes you use and therefore the chords and therefore the scale. The notes are the most important and if the scale contains all the notes within the key but not nessecarily in the right order that is a mode of the scale. for example C major all notes of this scale can be found in the a natural minor g mixolydian d dorian and e phrigyan.

tell me whats wrong, because i think you are

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metaladdict123 wrote on Dec 5th, 2009 1:03am

please tell me how im incorrect about modes because i seriously think you've learnt them wrong

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henis wrote on Jun 29th, 2009 8:50am

thanks again, I'm working on some new ones, I'll let you know

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henis wrote on Jun 21st, 2009 8:19pm

thanks for commenting on the songs dude!

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jasonggabbott wrote on Mar 2nd, 2009 12:20am

Hey bud! Thanks for listening to my tunes. If you get time to listen to more I would be pleased. Also check out my best of UG playlist. A comment or two would be nice too.
POST some of YOUR music please.

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