Baba O'Riley

Baba O'Riley's Profile Comments

Comments: 36, viewing 1 - 20

jossy~ wrote on Mar 18th, 2012 3:01pm

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meliasuny wrote on Feb 9th, 2012 10:06pm

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vivianabunga wrote on Jan 14th, 2012 3:32pm

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Kensai wrote on Oct 11th, 2011 1:16am

Baba O'Riley wrote on Oct 10th, 2011 at 5:01am :
I wouldn't bet on the Bears. It's an away game for them and they can be inconsistent. I am cheering for the Lions though.

Just outside of Miami is a second home to me.


Lions have their winning streak but honestly I think Bears have a better team. Game starts pretty soon, though I won't have time to watch it all. It'll be interesting nonetheless.

Is that where you grew up or something?

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dann_blood wrote on Sep 10th, 2011 12:59pm

That book (Corporations one) looks really interesting though :) Put it on a to-get list. Also going to watch the documentary.

Pfft, what was your plan exactly? :p I came across some new information and changed my mind. I'm extreme like that.

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dann_blood wrote on Sep 10th, 2011 12:59pm

Ah, icwutumean on Marx. I think it's a bit hard to fault him for that, writing in the 19th century and all. There's plenty of discussion among other commies though, it's a part of why there's so much fragmentation there, but Marx could've addressed some of this stuff. You should PM a user on here called Nietsche, he's like Marx's biographer.
On Stalin - historically economies were really unstable (IIRC 8 depressions in the US over a 130 year period), but half the population were still communists, so I don't think economic recovery had much to do with it. Imo the way communism was co-opted by a dictator and the subsequent fear campaign had more to do with it.

If you're still interested in economics i'd recommend microeconomics by Pindyck & Rubinfeld. It's pretty good, though it's also a textbook, so it's as entertaining as drying paint. I've also been trying to find an equivalent macro textbook, but no luck.

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dann_blood wrote on Aug 27th, 2011 12:45pm

Yo. Changed my mind and come to agree with you on this:
[QUOTE=baba]I disagree that the private section is reluctant to create new markets based on new products and inventions.[/QUOTE]

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dann_blood wrote on Jul 19th, 2011 1:24pm

I think prose is just dense that way. Historically communism was really popular among the population up until Stalin co-opted it.

I dunno, I don't think computers vs green industies is a fair comparison. Electronics spent decades struggling for development in Silicon valley, and it took another few decades post-launch for success. They have more tangible benefits, had platforms to launch off, as well as demand-side increasing returns. Renewable energy doesn't really have any of that, and the market/political landscape is completely different.
In todays business investment world it's not rational to invest in new industries.
Sorry that this is so blunt. Trying to keep it to one comment here :p

I don't generally like recommending economics books like that. Not as though they're not helpful, but they're difficult to judge without an existing knowledge on economics. I always recommend reading a good intro textbook on micro and macro economics, as they give an impartial background into almost every topic.

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dann_blood wrote on Jul 13th, 2011 7:12am

New products and inventions can create new markets, and subsequently new jobs, but the private sector is reluctant to do that. Look at the renewable energy industry, there's massive potential there, but businesses won't take the risk. It doesn't really address the structural problems with the economy though, which is that there is only so much money that can be spent. New money creation is a potential solution, but it requires economic growth that can't realistically be achieved without an entire restructuring of an economy.

Fuck, this turned out to be a long comment :haha:

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dann_blood wrote on Jul 13th, 2011 7:12am

So most of the population can satisfy their basic needs, as well as have income to spare. The markets then evolve to satisfy wants and desires, with leisure items, basically trying to provide the means to satisfy the top 3 tiers of Maslows hierarchy of needs. But there's only so much spare money people have to spend, or if they're saving their money this is redistributed throughout the system through banks/investments until a time when the people saving money want to spend. This is the point where the economy is working at full steam, and economic growth is no longer possible because we're pushing the limits of the finite world. Economy's stagnate.

Enter debt. Deregulation of the financial sectors lets people borrow money with continually decreasing requirements to continue economic growth. This accounts for the economic growth the Western world experienced from the 1980's through to 2008, and I think you know how well all that debt turned out to be.

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dann_blood wrote on Jul 13th, 2011 7:11am

Well, I dunno, I might be :p I think communism has merit, despite possibly being the most misunderstood idea in history.

Post-scarcity economics contends that we're at a point where further economic growth can't be sustained without sending the economy into disequilibrium. Basically, we can provide all the physiological needs for the entire population (housing, food, water, healthcare, etc), but there's a point where it's no longer profitable to do so. Pushing beyond that limit requires stimulation the market can't provide.

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baby41love wrote on Jul 2nd, 2011 6:21pm

Hello with love,

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Note: My native language is English so i will appreciate you writing to me in English.

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baby41love wrote on Jul 2nd, 2011 5:47pm

Hello with love,

How is every thing with you, I picked interest on you after going through your short profile. I really want to have a good friendship with you. Beside i have something very vital to disclose to you, but I found it difficult to express myself here, since it's a public site. I will be very happy, If you can get back to me through my e-mail (faith4turelove@yahoo.com) So we can get to know each other better and i well give you my pictures and also tell you more about me ok.

Please write me here (faith4turelove@yahoo.com)

Note: My native language is English so i will appreciate you writing to me in English.

Sincerely
Miss faith.

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dann_blood wrote on Jul 2nd, 2011 1:04pm

Well, I guess you could theoretically include people with at the mental level of 12 year olds under my definition :p

Post-scarcity is an economic school of thought. It basically holds that we're at a point in history where there's enough raw materials, food, energy, resources, technological labour, etc, to provide for everyone on the planet, with some of those things being available so readily that they can be provided for free. There's little room for any real economic growth in countries that reach this point as all the basic material and physiological needs for people can be easily met. I think we more or less have the means for this, but it's more or less arbitrarily prevented from happening by the pursuit of profit.

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dann_blood wrote on Jun 28th, 2011 12:43pm

I find the pit's just an extension of most of the real world :p

Oh ya, I wouldn't expect someone to read all the Redwall books. Most of them are standalones anyway, alot of them follow more or less the same formula, and they're all very similar as far as themes go. The author died earlier this year though.

More or less, ya, my view of egalitarianism is equal rights for all. I don't think it quite covers my views though. I'm also a Rawlsian, post-scarcity proponent, ethical humanist, etc. I just think the label egalitarian lends itself to those things more.

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dann_blood wrote on Jun 27th, 2011 10:04am

:haha:
Ya, the sexism gets annoying fast. Though it's probably not as bad as some of the people in the Pit.

Ah, the first Redwall book. Cluny the Scourge. I dunno, I always make sure to read the whole book, even if I don't like it. I'm a sucker for good climactic endings. I can understand someone stopping in the middle though.

Ya, i'd probably agree with that interpretation. I think it goes further than that though, like, punching both men and women might be equality but it's still not right. Imo egalitarianism lends itself more to a rights-based approach with a foundation in ethics and morality. And i'd say equal opportunity is a part of egalitarianism.

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dann_blood wrote on Jun 26th, 2011 5:01pm

Baba O'Riley wrote on Jun 27th, 2011 at 2:40am :
I think that's a common reaction to a lot of their stuff.

I think that one article was a bit worse :haha:

Which Redwall book did you try read? Admittedly they're a bit more geared towards kids that like that sort of noble warrior, fantastical thing. I used to own every book. Sold them because I was short on money, i've regretted it ever since.

Long story short, I decided egalitarian is more appropriate for my views. Still a feminist and supporter of feminism, but I don't think the goals of feminism can really be reached unless there's equality for everyone.

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dann_blood wrote on Jun 23rd, 2011 6:25am

I guess it makes me more considerate of others, and understanding why other people are different helps me with my own self-reflection. I read a beautiful book recently, Someplace to be Flying, and one of his major themes was about discovering a whole new way of thinking about the world, and the realisation that some people won't look at things the same way... but it's ok, because they're still good people. I think that if I don't consider others, and not put myself in their shoes, then i'd just be confined to a very narrow, biased and probably unrealistic perspective.

That t-nation article makes me cringe :p I mean, again, what we think motivates us is often wrong. There's alot of factors at play at any one time, and our perspectives limit the things we see motivating us. Most of the evidence on human behaviour, including cross-cultural studies, indicates quite strongly certain things.

Superhero comics... well, I read the redwall books when I was a kid, and it more or less had the same themes :haha:

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dann_blood wrote on Jun 21st, 2011 1:25pm

Kewl :cheers:

Your questions don't get any easier, do they? :p I can't say with any certainty what motivates me. What we think motivates us is often wrong. Most of the stuff i'd say motivates me are things most other people would say. Probably comes across as vain and cliche.
That aside, i'd say i'm motivated by the same basic desires as other people. Other than that, I think the biggest one would be empathy, and not being judgmental of others. Trying to step back and be able to look at the things I do and say what I did was right, from both a technical and moral perspective, would be another.
So ya, pretentious crap :p I don't really rate women as a motivational thing, or at least not consciously. It has to be someone I care about before I get the desire to do things for them. Other than that they're just other people, and I can't help but think that being motivated to do things differently for women is sorta condescending.

Well, now my essays out of the way, what do you think motivates you?

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dann_blood wrote on Jun 21st, 2011 2:21am

I dunno... I think that the desire to be with the partner would have to be tied to another one or few desires. There's alot that goes on under the surface, and alot of the reason we find in things are post-rationalisation; I think that because of that we see certain things and attribute to a certain event or person, when while that event or person may have been involved it's more incidental. I think this applies more-so to weightlifting because those linking motivational factors are much further away.

To try and fit this into one comment: the other stuff was Two-factor theory and the evidence. I think the desire to be taken seriously is the most important because it pops up all across all the different theories in some form or another. It was formalised by an Australian psychologist; I can link you to a lecture of his where he talks about it in the first 7 or so minutes if you'd like.

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